Davao

SOS Children’s Village Davao

On September 12, 1981, the largest SOS Children’s Village in the Philippines was inaugurated and opened its 14 houses to children in need. It is still the only SOS Children’s Village in Mindanao area. Currently, it is home to 110 children and its youth facility caters to 55 young adults who are preparing to have independent lives. It also provides educational and medical support to 623 children in the neighboring communities.

In 2008, the SOS Children’s Village was awarded the Best Non-Government Organization by the Department of Social Welfare and Development Region XI in Davao City.


Our stories

The baby who had nothing but a name

It was a surprising day for the Davao City’s social welfare and development department when an unknown woman, who looked frantic and hopeless, left a baby girl at their doorway. She left the baby with nothing but a few information about her birth which included a name—Irene.

The baby found a temporary home in one of the agency’s orphanages. She grew up to be a petite, chubby, and smart girl who always wore a wide smile that brightened up her young persona.

Few years went by, a big family reached out to the agency to adopt young Irene. They eventually got the permission to provide foster care for her, the first stage towards adoption. The young girl got so excited when she knew that she would finally be part of a family. But when the foster care period ended, the agency decided that it was not for the best interest of Irene to remain with her foster family.

The agency kept on looking for a home where Irene could be loved and where her potentials could be fully developed. Eventually, the social welfare office reached out to SOS Children’s Village Davao which did not hesitate to welcome the young girl. It was then that the seven-year-old petite girl with a pixie haircut embraced a new family she could call her own.

Irene grew up to be a smart, diligent, helpful, and generous sister to her SOS siblings. Whenever her younger brothers and sisters needed help with their school assignments, she always made time to lend a hand. And whenever her aunties and uncles in the SOS Children’s Village needed help, she always volunteered to do a task or two.

One day she broke the question, “Who are my real parents? And where could they be?” But nobody could answer. She seemed a lost girl who couldn’t anymore find her way back to where she came from. But she was a strong girl and she did not let her past bring her down. With the love and guidance from her SOS family, she rose from her past and moved on towards fulfilling her dreams.

When she went to college, she chose to take up social work. In SOS Children’s Village, she saw how a social worker could contribute greatly to children like her and to the communities. She wanted to be a person who could make a difference and change lives for the better.

On June 2016, after all the hard work and challenges she went through, she finally marched down the university aisle to receive her diploma. “I never thought that I would be able to make it through college. But here I am, holding a college degree. Soon, I will be able to reach out to children and communities in dire need. I am an SOS child who can be an inspiration to my fellow SOS children and to everyone,” Irene said with full of enthusiasm.


One day she broke the question, “Who are my real parents? And where could they be?” But nobody could answer. She seemed a lost girl who couldn’t anymore find her way back to where she came from. But she was a strong girl and she did not let her past bring her down. With the love and guidance from her SOS family, she rose from her past and moved on towards fulfilling her dreams.

When she went to college, she chose to take up social work. In SOS Children’s Village, she saw how a social worker could contribute greatly to children like her and to the communities. She wanted to be a person who could make a difference and change lives for the better.

On June 2016, after all the hard work and challenges she went through, she finally marched down the university aisle to receive her diploma. “I never thought that I would be able to make it through college. But here I am, holding a college degree. Soon, I will be able to reach out to children and communities in dire need. I am an SOS


A chat with Mama Terrie

Teresa Tuble, or Mama Terrie, was one of the first SOS Mothers hired to care for children at SOS Children’s Village Davao when it opened in 1981. She’s retiring at the village this year after having raised 36 children in 35 years.

We had a chance to sit down with her and we asked some questions. Here’s what she candidly said.

Why did you decide to work for SOS Children’s Villages?
As a social work major in college, I had experience working with children at kindergartens, orphanages and children with special needs. One day, I came to the SOS Children’s Village in Davao City and applied for a job. I was concerned that I wouldn’t be ready for such a challenging job, but eventually I saw how I can help the children who lost their family. I saw myself becoming a family for them. It was a challenging job to get used to, but my ties with the children convinced me to stay and continue.

What has been the most challenging part of the work that you do?
Just like every mother, the most challenging part of my job is when our children are slowly becoming adolescents. They face lots of issues within themselves such as rebelliousness, aggression, becoming independent, and many more.

What has been the biggest impact you have had on the lives of the children under your care?
The biggest impact I have on them is the love we share. When they start revealing their life stories with other people, it makes me proud to know that I am a part of their stories. I want my children to know that they should never hesitate to come visit me. So as long as I am living, I am their SOS Mother. They can come here and visit their home anytime they want. I am their home.

What makes you most proud about being the first SOS Mother at SOS Davao?
My children. Who and what they have become have always made me proud. Whether they are financially successful or not, I am happy they are my children. Being a pioneering SOS

Mother in Davao is a privilege but a big responsibility. I always tell myself to serve as a good example to the younger and newer mothers.
What is the biggest difference between SOS Davao in 1981 when you first joined SOS and SOS Davao now?
There are so many differences. Children before exerted more effort since there is not a lot of resources such as technology, while children now find things so convenient because of technology.

How has SOS Davao remained the same over the past 30 years?
The purpose of taking good care of the children is the same. It has never changed throughout the years. Our aim to be a family to them remains the same.

What will you miss the most about being an SOS Mother?
Definitely, my children. And our home.

In what ways will you still maintain a connection with SOS Davao?
I will always maintain my connection to the children. My children can always visit me in my retirement home at the SOS Village. And I can have the children help me stay connected with technology.